Street photography – how to practice your skills

If you are looking to hone your street photography skills you should try covering a march or a demo in London.  It will give you a great opportunity to practice those key skills (composition and timing) while allowing you to engage with people in a non-threatening way.  Everyone expects to be photographed on a march so you won’t stand out and as one of a crowd of photographers you are less likely to be nervous. Some people say that street photography is always about getting close to the subject with a short lens, sticking the camera in people’s faces and taking the shot.  I tend to think that is too prescriptive.  You should use whatever method makes you comfortable and as long as you aren’t being intrusive or creepy about it a long lens is perfectly fine. In fact I would say that when photographing a march it is almost a prerequisite as it allows you to pick people out of the crowd, will normally throw the background out of focus, and can still allow for personal engagement.  All of the shots here were taken with a Fuji X-T1 with the 55-200mm zoom lens.  ISO was set to auto (max 6400, default 200 and minimum shutter speed of 1/200).  Most demos look best in colour but sometimes black and white is the way to go if you want the shot to look timeless.  There is a mix of both types below. So next time you see a demo or march in London don’t walk the other way – head into the action and get some great photos!

London street photography

CND march in London – January 2015

London street photography

CND march in London – January 2015

London street photography

Taking a selfie at Pride London 2014

London street photography

Pride London 2014

London street photography

Anti-austerity march 2014

Fuji X-T1 sample image

London Pride with 55-200mm zoom lens

London street photography

Pride London 2014

Fuji X-T1 sample image

Pride in London with 55-200mm lens

About photoponica

A documentary style photographer - started with film now shooting digital with the Fuji X system.
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